WHANGANUI RAILWAY BRIDGE

In 1871 the long-awaited bridge over the river was opened to carry all traffic between Wanganui and the northern districts, and the railway bridge further up-stream was completed six years later. Railway construction was slow, however, and it was not until 1885 that Wanganui was linked with New Plymouth. Finally, in November 1886, when the Manawatu Railway Company’s line was opened from Thorndon (Wellington) to Longburn, rail transport was thus available from Wanganui to Wellington. From 1882 to 1891, however, the growth of population was very slow. The expansion that did take place was largely due to the growth of dairying, not only locally but also in Taranaki, for the lack of suitable ports in the northern district was a gain to Wanganui.

‘WANGANUI’, from An Encyclopaedia of New Zealand, edited by A. H. McLintock, originally published in 1966.
Te Ara – the Encyclopedia of New Zealand
URL: http://www.TeAra.govt.nz/en/1966/wanganui (accessed 03 Aug 2017)

…and the view back towards the city.

ANCIENT SWIMMERS

New Zealand’s longfin eels (Anguilla dieffenbachia)

The longfin eels of New Zealand are a unique and threatened species with a precarious future.  They can take 20 or more years to reach maturity, and reproduce only once In their lives.  Once they are mature they leave their freshwater homes and swim many miles out to sea where the eggs are laid and fertilized.  They then drift back to New Zealand on the ocean currents, eventually swimming upstream to restart the life cycle.

interplay
sunlight on water
hiding place

ISAIAH

for thus says the Lord

I will extend prosperity to her
like a river
and the wealth of the nations
like an over-flowing stream

as a mother comforts her children
so I will comfort you
and you will see
your bodies will flourish like grass

the earth waits, trembling
for the day of the Lord
for the sound of the trumpet
heralding peace

and in that day
all tears will be dried
see, I make all things new